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The Shifting Urban Body: In the Culture of Recognition

Shifting Urban Body: In the Culture of Recognition The Shifting Urban Body: In the Culture of Recognition. Copyright &copy 1995 Mike McCabe On their voyages across the surface of the earth, 15th and 16th century maritime explorers referred to the unknown regions of the globe as Terra-Incognita or uncharted territory. They roamed the surface of the world blindly, unaware of the significance of its contour. Without the luxury of a map, early explorers had no meaningful framework that could orient them in their travels, there was no top or bottom to anything. There was nothing but the stars to help ... read more

My First Mhendi

First Mhendi My First Mhendi So I am now typing with my left hand delightfully decorated a yummy shade of sienna. It looks so pretty I just keep staring at it... it's almost hypnotic! I had gone to 3 Indian stores Thursday but wanted to go to the one a couple of minutes away from my home... so did that this morning. I found the most gentle woman working there... one who took over an hour showing me around the small store, describing the different foods and such... and then, sharing her knowledge of mhendi with me. Her daughter, who ... read more

Woad Beta-FAQ

AQ Woad Beta-FAQ Some woad info provided by Pat Fish A WEAVER'S GARDEN by Rita Buchanan Interweave Press, Colorado '87 ISBN 0-934026-28-9 WOAD Isatis tinctoria Mustard family. May have been the first plant cultivated for its pigment. By far the most widely used dyestuff in Europe for centuries, prior to the introduction of indigo from India in the 1600's. An easy-to-grow and reliable source of blue dye. Germanic name "weeda" source of "weed." Grows in a "weedy" wind dispersed manner. Likes full sun and moisture and rich compost. 12"-15" apart. Basal rosette of oblong, slightly hairy leaves first season. 6"-18" ... read more

EUNUCHS IN INDIA

UCHS IN INDIA EUNUCHS IN INDIA It has been estimated that there are at least a million eunuchs in India. They are known as hijra, and make their livings as beggars, prostitutes and by removing "bad luck". Visitors to India can frequently see groups of gaudily dressed hijra outside large railway stations. They beg for money and, if you refuse, you will be loudly cursed and they will expose the area between their legs where their genitals used to be. Many of them have also had this area branded, so that at first glance they appear to be women. The ... read more

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