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Hooks in Knees - take it as it is.

For my second suspension I had decided that I wanted to try one from my knees. I remember looking at pictures of others doing them before and thinking that I could never pierce my knees, let alone hang my whole body weight on them. I don't know why exactly, but after doing a 4 pt. suicide suspension it just felt like it wouldn't be that bad. I know that the lessons I learned from my first experience definitely helped my second one go much smoother.

Russ Foxx organized another indoor suspension event and I was stoked to go up. The new studio that we used had lots of swing space so I was a bit disappointed to not go from my back again, but I was determined to try a new type of suspension out. The idea got into my head to hang from my knees so I just had to go for it and at least try. I had seen that other people had done knee suspensions as their second experience so I figured it wasn't too intense. I was very glad to find out that I was right.

In preparing for the suspension this time I focused on having food in my stomach and sugar in my blood. I also didn't want to go last and end up being really tired once my turn rolled around. This time I had the advantage of knowing what was coming as well.

The idea of piercing my knees was daunting at first. Specifically, I didn't want to pierce the fleshy top part of my knee. I had gone with the idea that I would do a 4 pt. suspension with a hook on either side of the cap, but Russ suggested that six would be much easier. I agreed and ended up getting that part of my knee pierced as well. I was cleaned, marked up and ready for the needles. I'm not actually sure what gauge they were. Maybe around 3mm. Each one was done individually so I had to sit through six piercings. The top parts were indeed the worst of it and even that wasn't too bad (maybe I was just grossed out by it mentally more than it actually hurting more). My left knee also seemed to feel the needle sharper than the other did. The outer sides were the easiest for me. What I could feel the most was the needle enter and exit my skin. And then a dull burning sensation. The hooks were put into place in one motion with the piercing. To be honest, I was shaking before I sat down to be pierced. And I probably will do the same when I get pierced again. But once it was done it seemed like it was nothing. I hopped down off the table gently and hobbled like a robot with its pants around its ankles to the rigging. (Yes, I was laughed at.)

With my creepy mechanical looking knees all ready to get roped to the rig I sat down on the padded table that was brought over. I would be pulled up as I lay on my back. Much nicer than lying on the floor. My first worry was that the hooks felt like they were really sticking to my skin. When we tried to slide them up into place using the rig but it just burned and wasn't comfortable at all. Russ pulled each one into an upright position by hand and that was probably the worst part of the whole experience. I did not like that at all.

Next I worried that I wouldn't be able to stand the pain enough to get myself off the table. We started slowly and I stopped every once and awhile to wait for the pain of the tension to ease. Starting the suspension took longer, but as I was eased further and further up it became easier. The weight of my legs had to go onto the hooks pretty much at once, but after that it became much faster for me to get raised. Along the way I was able to shift the tension between the three hooks on each knee. Mostly I took tension off the side hooks and onto the top center ones. They really helped. There was an awkward part when my shoulders and neck were the only part of me still on the table. From there I just had Russ get me up and into the air quickly. I was totally suspended.

The pain in my knees felt more like a tingly numbness after awhile. My legs from my knees down felt weightless. I could still reach the table with my hands to push myself and swing a bit. I loved it! I'm not sure how long I was up, but I could have stayed hanging and swinging and spinning for a very long time. My face was the most uncomfortable part of the actual suspension as blood rushed and pooled in it. I relieved it by pulling myself up and curling into a ball, but it strained my skin on the hooks in the process of getting into that position and lowering myself back down gently was very difficult. I don't exactly have a six-pack, you see. The last time I curled up I let myself down too fast and jerked my weight on the hooks, which hurt quite a bit. I decided I had been swinging long enough and my head felt heavy from being upside down. Time to come down.

The hooks were lubed up and removed. I had bled a little, but not much. There wasn't much air in my knees that I could tell. I was cleaned up and bandaged. Most of the bleeding occurred later while I was walking around. They barely felt sore right after. The bleeding stopped several hours later (I do tend to take awhile to clot up though). I did end up going through many Band-Aids though with twelve puncture wounds.

The next day I was happy to feel that my knees were just fine. There was maybe a bit of air where the center, top hooks were placed but it was at worst like a bruise. Doing a knee suspension was MUCH easier on my body the next day compared to doing one from the back. I am very pleased with the super cute little scabs I have in an almost triangular arrangement around my kneecap now.

I definitely recommend a knee suspension to anyone who is just starting to get into suspensions and wants to try something different. Or, if you do not want to have such a sore body the next day, this would be a great option. In my opinion, it looks much worse than it actually is, and the idea of it freaks people out more than anything else.

Happy hanging,

`Dagon

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submitted by: Anonymous
on: 07 March 2007
in Ritual

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Artist: Russ+Foxx
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Location: Vancouver%2C+BC.

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